Programme details, programme outline and conference themes


Detailed programme and presentations

For more details on the programme please click on the following link: http://eche2010.abstractbook.org/


Programme outline (version 16 June 2010)

Click here to open printable version of the programme outline below (PDF)

Please note that the GENI satellite session planned for 7 July 2010 has been CANCELLED.

 Conference themes


Main themes of ECHE 2010
01. Economics of ageing
02. Economics of information technology in health care
03. Economics of prevention and health promotion
04. Economics of social care
05. Health care financing and provision
06. Implementing health economics
07. Macro economics, health and health care
08. Migration, health and labour markets
09. New developments in the theory and methodology of health economics
10. Performance measurement in health care systems
11. Pharmaceutical markets
12. Valuing health
13. Economic evaluation

Abstract submission instructions and online abstract submission
Please see:
http://eche2010.abstractsubmit.org
Deadline for submission of abstracts
The abstract submission has been closed on 15 December 2009.


Main themes of ECHE 2010 in more detail

01. Economics of ageing
The topic of the microeconomics of ageing discusses the demand and supply decisions associated with ageing. The demand and the supply, provision and financing, of health care are changing in Europe due to the ageing of the population. On the demand side, the needs, need perceptions, utilization and financial, social and psychological resources of the ageing population will likely change. On the supply side, the ageing of the labour force may impact the service provision. At the macroeconomic level the changing age-structure within the population has implications for the functioning and economic sustainability of health care systems. We invite papers that discuss ageing and health care both from a microeconomic and macroeconomic point of view.

02. Economics of information technology in health care
The development of information technology (IT) affects health care in many ways. While IT may or may not influence the demand for care, it certainly affects the production of services and integration of care, financing and provision etc.. Moreover, the patient’s role in care processes is expected to change with the introduction of new IT. This session expects a wide variety of studies on IT. Papers on the microeconomics of IT, both from patients’, producers’ and also providers’/payers’ points of view are welcome. Similarly, studies on the macroeconomics of information technology (such as trends), and on economic evaluation of information technologies are also welcome. 

03. Economics of prevention and health promotion
Nowadays, there is a strong belief that by allocating more resources to prevention, the population's health can be substantially improved while at the same time reducing the growth of health care costs. The purpose of this theme is to present studies that investigate the potential of prevention to reduce the incidence and prevalence of acute and chronic diseases. This theme invites presentations that assess the economic, efficiency and distributional impacts of prevention strategies and also those that assess policy interventions aiming to reduce the occurrence of diseases and accidents and their complications. These may include, for example, cost‑effectiveness analyses of different prevention interventions aimed at reducing lifestyle risk factors, or evaluations of early detection strategies or health promotion activities. We also welcome papers that assess economic and social determinants of ill health and risky behaviour.

04. Economics of social care
Organisation, provision and financing of social care vary from country to country. In some countries social services are closely linked with the health sector, while in other countries it is linked with the social sector, especially in the case of elderly care and care for the disabled. We invite papers discussing both broad and specific economic aspects of social services. Papers may address topics dealing with the economics of social care systems, the organising, provision and financing social care, efficiency and productivity issues, as well as issues related to social security. Papers discussing the economic and functional integration of health and social services are also welcome.

05. Health care financing and provision
Health care systems are undergoing continuous reforms in attempts to improve efficiency in the financing and provision of services. Centralisation, integration, payment for performance, outsourcing, privatisation, service vouchers and waiting-time reforms are some examples of topical issues discussed in many countries. All reforms that affect the prevailing provision and financing system have both intended and unintended financial, incentive and distributional effects on the health care systems, services, providers and professionals. Papers discussing both broad and specific issues in health care financing and provision and their incentive and distributional effects are welcome. Research on new emerging financing models as well as service vouchers, personal health saving accounts and new forms of health insurance are invited. Studies on the incentive effects of health care reforms on a system, organisational and personnel level are welcome. We look forward to studies on tax- and insurance-based systems as well as public–private mix systems. Studies on various provision and resource allocation mechanisms, e.g., pricing and capitation methods, are welcome as well as studies on user charges and deductibles.

06. Implementing health economics
The number of professional health economists and published research has increased dramatically over the years. Is there evidence that the growing numbers have affected health care decision-making, i.e., is health economics research cost-effective? We invite papers that highlight how health economics research has influenced health policy decision-making as well as the financing and organising of health care services at the macro-, meso- or micro level. We also welcome papers that shed light on what factors promote acceptance of recommendations by health economics research.  

07. Macro economics, health and health care
Health is a central input to socioeconomic development. Cost-effective interventions for controlling major diseases exist, but economies are facing major resource constraints due to aging populations and intensifying tax competition across countries. At the same time, a range of system constraints hamper global and national efforts to develop innovate solutions. Health economists often focus on economic impacts within the health care sector, giving less attention to the wider effects on societies. Given the size of possible effects beyond the health care sector, knowledge about the social efficiency of various policies may depend on the assessment of these wider effects. We welcome all contributions to the discussion on the relationship between the health sector and the macroeconomy.

08. Migration, health and labour markets
Ageing of the population and the declining labour force are anticipated to create new challenges for health care markets in many European countries. Several countries have started to recruit health care professionals abroad to alleviate the increasing demand for skilled labour. At the same time, non-labour related migration outside Europe has forced health systems to respond to a changing disease spectrum and cultural challenges posed by migrants. We invite papers discussing current and anticipated economic issues within health care labour markets in general, as well as papers specifically focusing on migration issues related to both professionals and migrants. Papers addressing the intricate relationship between migration, migrants’ health and its impact on demand and supply in health care services in Europe are also welcome.

09. New developments in the theory and methodology of health economics
The theoretical and empirical methodologies of health economics have developed rapidly in recent years because of improved theoretical methods and access to better data sets. We invite new theoretical and methodological contributions in all fields of health economics. Submissions in the fields of health economics with less theoretical and methodological emphasis are particularly welcome, but new contributions in already well-developed fields are also appreciated. Special emphasis will be on payment mechanisms and incentives in health care, the role of information in agency relationships, the role of cost-effectiveness analysis in the pricing, reimbursement and innovation of health care technologies, and new developments in the methodology of economic evaluation. Both theoretical analysis and new methodological approaches in empirical health economics are equally welcome.

10. Performance measurement in health care systems
Performance measurement evaluates the extent to which a health care system meets its key objectives. The measurement can be performed at different levels; health care system, health care organisation or individual practitioner.  We invite papers discussing various economic aspects of performance evaluation, such as measurement of equity, efficiency and productivity, as well as papers discussing performance measurement in specific domains, e.g., hospital, primary care and mental care. Papers dealing with the role of performance measurement in influencing health policy, e.g., how performance indicators are used to reward providers, are also welcome.

11. Pharmaceutical markets
Pharmaceutical markets are in a state of flux in many European countries. The increasing role of generics, reference pricing and other forms of regulation have increased price and quality competition within the market. The quest for value for money is one of the most critical challenges faced by pharmaceutical markets in many countries. We invite papers discussing the relationship between drug costs and benefits from different viewpoints: patient, health care organisation, industry and society. Papers related to pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research are invited. Also papers discussing the role of cost-effectiveness in reimbursement systems, the regulation of pharmaceutical markets and methodological issues are welcome.

12. Valuing health
When estimating quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for cost-utility analyses of health care technologies a crucial question is the extent to which the values for health states produced by health-related quality of life instruments are valid in reflecting trade-offs between length and quality of life. Similarly, when carrying out cost-benefit analyses a crucial question is, how to derive a valid monetary value for health effects. There are conflicting opinions about the validity of different valuation methods in these respects – there is no gold standard of how (by which valuation method) and from whom the valuations should be derived. We welcome especially papers that address these types of validity-related issues, either from a theoretical or empirical perspective or otherwise shed new light onto the issue of valuing health.

13. Economic evaluation
The economic evaluation of health care systems, services, products, methods and processes may be one of the largest and most active fields of research within health economics. While most of the published economic evaluations have focused on micro-evaluation, i.e., cost-effectiveness of health care interventions and products, the methodology can be applied at the meso-level to assess the performance of organisations, e.g., hospitals, as well as the at macro-level to assess health systems performance. Papers presenting empirical results on the micro-, meso- and macroeconomic evaluation of health care products, services, methods and processes as well as economic evaluations of health care systems are welcome under this theme.